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Green River Shawl

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Green River Shawl

One of the nicest things about the TUT Ravelry group is when regular members who have been so supportive of my yarns publish a pattern. It’s so nice to see my yarns helping to create inspiration in designers and being able to share their talents here on the blog. Maanel has been a regular in the group, sharing her many wonderful projects and so when she published this design, I asked instantly if we could share it as it’s truly beautiful.

The Green River Shawl  is a top-down triangle shawl with two edge stitches and a 1 stitch center spine. The increases are worked four at a time on every RS row so this is a quick and easy to memorize knit. The construction makes the lace easy to read and the motif is simple enough that I’d say this would be good for adventurous beginner’s to dive into the world of lace. I think the lace detail is charming.

(c) Maanel

The shawl is worked in Super Sock, a super soft 2ply yarn that can be worn right next to the skin. It has a high twist and lovely texture. Although I recommend hand-washing to prolong the life of your knits, this yarn may be machine washed on a gentle wool cycle, then laid flat to dry so it would be a hardy accessory that could be worn time and time again easily. The colour of the sample is called ‘Dartmoor’ a deep and luscious green but I can imagine this in lots of different colours due to its’ striking motif.

(c) Maanel

A fabulous shawl pattern Maanel, well done!

Weld

Categories: patterns using TUT yarnTags: , , , , , , Author:

Weld

A few months ago, I was part of a swap and was lucky enough to have designer Meghan Jackson aka Butterfly Knits, as my swap partner. Not only was  I spoilt with goodies but I also received a summery shawl of her own design. I insisted that when she released the pattern, she should let me know so I could share the details here.

(c) Meghan Jackson

Weld is a customizable shawl by knitting as many or as few repeats of the main body as you like. The size of shawl may also vary with how severely the project is blocked. Due to the flexible nature of the design, this pattern would look great in fingering or DK weight yarns as well. Meghan used TUT’s Silky Alpaca Sport in the Brassica colourway and includes this note on her pattern page about this source of inspiration:

From the Brassica family of plants, weld has been used throughout history as a natural yellow dye. Inspired by the Brassica colour of a gorgeous skein of The Uncommon Thread Silky Alpaca yarn, Weld is a textured and lace one-skein crescent shaped shawlette knit from the top down.

(c) Meghan Jackson

This base is exclusive to Tangled Yarn, one of our fabulous stockists so to get your hands on a skein, please visit their website here. For more options, of different TUT yarns, please visit the yarn page to start plotting your new shawl!

Blight

Categories: patterns using TUT yarnTags: , , , Author:

Blight

For those of you who love lace, shawls and delicate accessories, you’re going to love this new pattern. Designed by Deborah Frank who designs and publishes patterns under the title ‘Oblivious Knits’, Blight is a beautiful shawl featuring TUT as a recommended yarn.

(c) Obliviousknits

Blight is a triangular lace shawl, knit from the center top down to the bottom edges. It uses one skein of fingering weight yarn, but could easily be made larger by working more repeats of the charts, although additional yarn will be necessary. The size can also be increased by changing needle/ yarn size.

The pattern calls for a skein of Heavenly Fingering, a delicious base that is perfect for such a luxurious knit. Each skein is approx 100g of fingering weight  yarn that blends 70% Baby Alpaca, 20% Silk and 10% Cashmere. Supremely soft, it has a slight shine and takes dye beautifully. It has lovely drape, making it perfect for shawls. The sample is shown here in Nimbostratus.

(c) Obliviousknits

A beautiful pattern Deborah, thank you for using TUT yarn!

 

 

 

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